No apologies in Turkey?

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  1. sumeyra

    sumeyra Üye

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    Turkish people have a lot of good qualities. They are energetic, open and direct, and they are well known for their hospitality. There are a few things I don't understand, however, including what seems to be an aversion to apologizing. Is it considered a weakness, perhaps?

    Recently I was cycling at Büyükada when a dog ran in front of my bike. I tried to stop quickly and came off the bike, hurting myself in the process.

    When I got back up, the owner of the dog did not say sorry or ask me if I was okay. She only tutted at me, as though I had done something stupid.

    Last year I was bitten by a dog at Büyükada. When I spoke to a man who was looking after the dogs, he told me not to worry because the dogs are all on medication.

    Again, he did not say sorry or ask me if I was okay. He did say that I might have frightened the dogs by riding too fast.

    When I first came to Turkey, I thought the people were very similar to anywhere else. But the more time I spend here, the more I become aware of some basic differences.

    Turkish people have a lot of good qualities. They are energetic, open and direct, and they are well known for their hospitality.

    There are a few things I don't understand, however, including what seems to be an aversion to apologizing. Is it considered a weakness, perhaps?

    I can only remember one time that a stranger said sorry to me in Turkey. I was in a queue with a cup of tea in my hand, which I was waiting to pay for, when he walked into me without looking.

    After he said sorry, he saw that some of the tea had gone onto his own trousers and he looked at me in an angry way. I could see that he was not sorry anymore, although he had caused the accident.

    There was another time in a restaurant when a waiter spilt hot soup on my trousers. I looked up at him in surprise, but I was even more surprised that, when he saw what he had done, he did not apologize. He only pointed at me trousers and said "Corba!"

    Perhaps I have been unlucky. Or perhaps this is a cultural difference. In the English language, it is very important to use polite language, and that includes saying sorry. We even apologize for things that are not our fault.

    This is only my view, and everybody's experiences are different. My hope is that, by writing about my personal experiences in Turkey, I can **** to increase understanding.

    written by Quentin Poulsen
    from Turkish Daily News


    ** Quentin Poulsen is a former New Zealand journalist who has been teaching English and traveling for nine years. **
  2. HePBiZ

    HePBiZ Üye

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    Bizi iyi tanımış. :) sağol paylaşım için
  3. sumeyra

    sumeyra Üye

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    You are welcome;)

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